Saving Money on a Computer for University

August 1st, 2011 → 1:15 pm @ // No Comments

Old computers

If your about to head off to University for the first time you’re likely to already be thinking about what you’re going to take with you. We’ve even written a University checklist for you to make sure you don’t forget anything.

Probably one of the most important items you’ll have with you is your computer. Not only because it’s likely to be the most expensive but it’ll also become the centre of your universe. You’ll rely on it to do everything.

With the cost of going to University now spiraling out of control it’s important to save money where possible. You may already have a computer to take with you or you might have been using the family computer at home. If you are looking at getting something to take with you then there are plenty of cost-effective solutions.

Buying New

If you’re going to buy new then there is plenty to choose from. It’s a competitive market and at this time of year, the back to school deals are rife. The highstreet shops will have a lot of tempting deals, some of which are genuinely good value for money. If you’re not squared up on your computers, take a friend who does along with you for some advice. Be sure to shop around.

Estimated Budget:  £300-£1000+

Refurbished

There are a number of sites and even shops who specialise in refurbished computer hardware. Some of them will have b-stock which are usually display models and returned items which work fine but aren’t packaged as new. This is a good opportunity to save a bit of money for the sake of it not coming in the original box or a few marks & scratches from being used in the shop. There are a number of dedicated wesites which offer computers for students. Many of these are refurbished units but have the bonus of coming with a warranty so you’re guaranteed it’ll work for however long.

Estimated Budget:  £200-£500

Ebay

This is a great place to go if you are much more technically-minded. You can get some great deals. Some people list laptops as faulty, which they are. But I’f you look at the details of the fault it could be as simple as a cracked screen or a hard drive failure. Most users can’t or won’t fix these issues. You can take advantage and get a decent spec’d laptop with a fixable fault. If the hard drive has failed, just replace it. A laptop with a broken screen can more than likely run perfectly well with an external monitor. Just be aware of more serious issues that either can’t be fixed or will cost a considerable amount of money ex: a fried motherboard.

Estimated Budget:  £0.01-£300

Freecycle

This is the best of option in terms of saving your budget, but it’s also the toughest to get what you’re looking for. Basically, the idea behind Freecycle is to connect those people who want to get rid of stuff to those looking for stuff. It’s pretty simple really. It keeps things from getting thrown away and benefits those who might not be able to obtain these items for their new cost. All you do is look for a group near you and see if there’s anything currently on offer that you want. You never know you might get lucky!

Estimated Budget:  FREE!

Another option is to take donations from friends and family members. My first computer, which I took to University was donated by my uncle. It wasn’t a fancy machine but let me work on assignments, stay in touch with people online and watch movies and listen to music.

As long as you aren’t planning to use any software which requires a machine with plenty of horsepower behind it (video editing, CAD etc) then you can manage just fine with a fairly under-powered machine. Don’t think you have to go out and buy the best laptop money can buy just for word-processing and Facebook.


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